Mold and mildew growth require several elements for idea growth — a source of food, warm temperatures and adequate moisture. Of those three, the presence of moisture is the most critical. Unfortunately, controlling the environment in your home can be tough.

Water Intrusion

Rainwater can enter a building through leaks in walls, windows or the roof. Surface or ground water may enter when there is poor foundation drainage. Flooding can, of course, cause catastrophic intrusion. In buildings that have slab construction, water can seep or wick up through the cement floor causing mold to grow on carpet pads or carpet backing. The building envelope (walls, windows, floors , roof , etc.) must be well maintained to prevent water from coming in, both to prevent mold growth and to maintain the structural integrity of the building.

Relative Humidity

The summer months and summer storms can cause relative humidity to soar both outdoors and inside your home. When the relative humidity inside your home becomes elevated, building materials and furnishings absorb the moisture. Those damp materials can then provide a good place for mold to grow. If the relative humidity in a home stays above 70 percent for extended periods of time, mold will almost certainly grow.

Water Vapor

However, humidity isn’t the only thing that can cause moisture in your home. Clothes dryers, bathrooms and kitchen can put a tremendous about of water vapor into the air. All three should be properly vented to the outdoors. Bathroom exhaust fan should be in use whenever the shower or bath is running. A properly vented kitchen exhaust fan can remove steam created during cooking.

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Testimonials

We made a big mistake by storing our foam mattresses in a moist area without a rubber cover. Consequently, a black mildew permeated nearly the whole thickness of the mattresses, some worse than others. Our first reaction was to discard the mattresses as we thought it was a hopeless problem. Just to be sure there was no solution to the mildew problem, we went to the internet. Somehow, we found Mold Off® which we thought should be used empirically before we threw the mattresses out. So we purchased a gallon of Mold Off® and sprayed it on one mattress, lathered it in and let it soak. Then, we sprayed it again and used a thick cotton towel to absorb the excess fluid. We were surprised to see the black color gradually disappear. Some of the stubborn stains we sprayed a third time and rubbed the stains with towels which removed most of the discoloration. What shocked us the most were the unbelievable final results! The foam mattresses remained firm and free of mildew for months and months to this day! We cannot thank the producers of Mold Off® enough for the great outcome.

- Judith & Franklin, New Hampshire